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2013

Leadership Readiness:
Exploring Student Development in the Context of Leadership Education


July 22-25, 2013
University of Louisville, KY, USA

Symposium (sim-'po-ze-?m): a formal meeting at which several specialists deliver short addresses on a topic or on related topics; participants engaging in a collection of opinions, dialogue and idea exchange.

About the Symposium and the Learner Community
The National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals, and other educators involved with promoting leadership education at colleges and universities. The program is coordinated by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP). The Symposium includes a variety of formats, exercises, and conversations to engage different learning styles and preferences, both introverted and extroverted. Given the immersive learning environment of the Symposium, it is advised that registrants have significant professional experience in leadership education. In order to fully engage in the Symposium learner community, participants are expected to have read several selected readings in advance of the arriving for the NLS experience. The National Leadership Symposium is designed for an intimate collegial learning environment of 50 participants. Your engagement will involve intense periods for learning in the large community, small group, and individual levels.


REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Symposium 2013 Focus:
Higher education leadership education programs that focus on post-industrial, transformational, and relational processes of leadership have proliferated in the past two decades. This year’s Symposium will focus on the intersections between human development theory, particularly focusing on college students, and leadership education programs. Guiding questions Symposium participants will reflect upon will include:

  • How ready are students to practice the foundational tenets of leadership processes, given what we know about development theory in general, and student leadership identity theory in particular?

  • To what extent should leadership educators attend to students’ developmental readiness as they create curriculum and recruit students for their programs?

  • Is developmental scaffolding of programs a strategy to advancing students’ competency and capacity for leadership?

  • How can educators develop practices that are sensitive to the developmental needs of today’s college students?

As in the past, this year’s National Leadership Symposium will provide a framework for theory to practice in delving into these and other questions.

Symposium Scholars-in-Residence:

Scholars-in-residence provide theoretical frameworks and practical considerations for this exploration. Scholars and participants will engage in thoughtful discourse about what it means to educate or develop students and design curriculum for learning leadership.

  • Michael Cuyjet

    Professor and Acting Department Chair in the College Student Personnel program at the University of Louisville; author of Multiculturalism on campus: Theories, models, and practices for understanding diversity and creating inclusion; scholarly interests include marginalized student populations and student development.

  • Susan Jones

    Associate Professor in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program at The Ohio State University; serves as the Associate Editor of Book Reviews for the Journal of College Student Personnel; scholarly interests include multiple identities and college student development.

  • Susan Komives

    Professor Emerita for College Student Affairs, University of Maryland; former president of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) and the American College Personnel Association (ACPA); lead researcher into the development of the Leadership Identity Development model.

  • Rebecca Reichard

    Visiting Professor, Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College; scholarly interests include leader self-development and impact of leadership research on intervention practice.

Program Chairs:

  • David Rosch
    Assistant Professor of Agricultural Leadership Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Michael Preston
    Director, Office of Student Involvement, University of Central Florida

Registration Limit:
This institute is limited to 50 participants and is open to NACA/NCLP members and non-members on a first-come, first-served basis.

Membership:

To join NCLP or renew your membership, please visit www.nclp.umd.edu

Accommodations:

The University of Louisville is proud to serve as host for the 2013 National Leadership Symposium. Housing, dining, and meeting facilities will all be on the University of Louisville main campus and are within a 10 minute walk of each other. National Leadership Symposium participants will be housed in suite style rooms in an on-campus residence hall and all symposium sessions will take place at the Student Activities Center. Louisville is located on the banks of the Ohio River in north-central Kentucky and is readily accessible by three Interstate highways, I-64, I-65 and I-71. The Louisville International Airport (SDF) also offers direct service to and from major destinations across the United States and is an easy 7 minute drive to the University of Louisville.

*You must be 18 years old or older to participate.

2011

Advancing Leadership Education:
Connecting to High Impact Practices


July 7-10, 2011
University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia

NLS 2011 Proceedings

About the Symposium

The National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals and other educators involved with promoting college student leadership education. The program is coordinated by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP).

Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium (included required reading prior to attending), it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 people.

Symposium Theme

According to Day, Harrison, and Halpin (2009, p. 185) “Leader identities are built through the integration of learning and leading experiences with the self. This year’s National Leadership Symposium will invite leadership educators to engage in rich dialogue and reflective discussion about what it means to be a leadership educator. Participants will enhance their own individual insight about their commitment to leadership education, and then explore larger questions related to the purpose of leadership education and how we best create space for gaining knowledge and fostering student learning. Evolving from why we do this work, to what is this work about, the symposium will turn toward what are we really ‘doing’ through leadership education. Research about high impact practices related to learning will be discussed. Scholar authors will provide theoretical frameworks and practical considerations for this exploration. Scholars and participants will engage in thoughtful discourse about what it means to educate or develop students and ourselves in leading and leadership. The overall goal of the 2011 National Leadership Symposium is to envision how the future of leadership education can promote increasingly complex ways of being, knowing, and doing.

Participants in the 2011 National Leadership Symposium will:

  • Envision the future of leadership education to promote increasingly complex ways of being, knowing, and doing.
  • Examine high impact practices for leadership development and their connection to enhanced learning and quality.
  • Investigate the intersection of leadership education and human development.
  • Unlock the potential of leadership educators through engagement in their own development.
  • Create a network of practitioners, educators and scholars that explores and informs a current understanding of leadership education.

Symposium Scholars:
  • Dr. Susan Albertine
    Vice President for Engagement, Inclusion and Success, Association of American Colleges & Universities
  • Dr. Lisa Boes
    Allston Burr Resident Dean of Pforzheimer House, Lecturer on Social Studies, Harvard University
  • Dr. Ron Riggio
    Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology, Former Director of the Kravis Leadership Institute, Claremont McKenna College

Program Chairs:
  • Dr. Marilyn Bugenhagen
    Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies, Marian University
  • Dr. Julie Owen
    Assistant Professor of Leadership & Integrative Studies, New Century College, George Mason University

Early Registration Fees and Deadline:
$540 until May 25

Regular Registration Fees and Deadline:
$570 after May 25

Final Registration Deadline:
June 9, 2011

Registration Limit:
This institute is limited to 50 participants and is open to NACA/NCLP members and non-members on a first-come, first-served basis.

Membership:
To join NCLP or renew your membership, please go to http://www.nclp.umd.edu/

Refund Policy for All NACA Institutes:
Refunds for registration will be made only for requests received in writing at the NACA Office prior to the early registration deadline for the respective event. No refunds will be given for registrations after the stated early registration deadline. However, participant substitutions may be allowed if the request is submitted no later than 3 weeks prior to the start of the institute. A $100 administrative fee will be charged for each cancellation.

Accommodations and Meals:
The registration fee includes housing and all meals. Efforts will be made to honor roommate requests that are submitted on the Participant Information Form included in the registration confirmation packet. If you do not have a roommate preference, a roommate will be assigned to you. All meals will be provided through your registration. Please indicate any special dietary needs on the Participant Information Form.

Registration:
Early registration begins March 2011

2010

20th Anniversary National Leadership Symposium

Transforming Leadership Education for Significant Learning

July 8th - 11th 2010
University of Richmond

NLS 2010 Proceedings

About the Symposium
The National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals and other educators involved with promoting college student leadership education. The program is coordinated by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP).

Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium (included required reading prior to attending), it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 people.

20th Anniversary Theme
For the 20th anniversary year of the National Leadership Symposium, the focus will be on the intersections of student learning and leadership. Transformative documents such as Powerful Partnerships and Learning Reconsidered challenge student affairs professionals to consider themselves as educators who facilitate student learning and development. Yet many practitioners continue to view themselves primarily as programmers, as providers of services and activities. This outlook can be especially detrimental to those working in the area of leadership development, which is increasingly calling for educators skilled in the creation of engaged pedagogy, integrative learning experiences, and intentional learning communities.

The Symposium puts forth the following suppositions: that leadership can and should be learned; that the learning and development leadership capacities are inextricably intertwined; and that leadership educators can purposefully foster learning environments that help students integrate knowledge, skills, and experiences in meaningful ways. The 2010 Symposium will offer an overview of some of the ways learning theories can be applied to student leadership development. It will examine socialization to the role of leadership educator and the role of authenticity in education and the development of intentional learning communities. Select learning theories and their implications for leadership learning will be presented. Strategies for constructing leadership-related learning outcomes and assessing leadership learning will also be discussed.

Participants in the 2010 National Leadership Symposium will:

  • Learn how to recognize the qualities and attributes of today's student learners.
  • Create environments that promote meaningful and measurable learning.
  • Foster a learning environment that will promote transformative learning in the context of leadership.
  • Develop a network of practitioners, educators, and scholars that can be used to augment their current understanding of leadership.


Scholars-in-Residence:
Dr. Dennis (Denny) Roberts - Assistant Vice President for Faculty and Student Services of Qatar Foundation
Dr. Stephen Quaye - Assistant Professor, College Student Personnel, University of Maryland
Dr. Jillian Kinzie - Associate Director, Center for Postsecondary Research & NSSE Institute, Indiana University System

Program Chairs:
Dr. Julie Owen -Assistant Professor, New Century College, George Mason University
Dr. Lucy Croft - Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, University of North Florida

Registration:
  • Early Registration Begins March 2010

2009

National Leadership Symposium

Leadership in a Global Context

July 9 - 12, 2009
University of Richmond

NLS 2009 Proceedings

Now in its 19th year, the National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals and other education practitioners involved with promoting college student leadership education.

The National Leadership Symposium is a joint program coordinated by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP). Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium (included required reading prior to attending) it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 people.

This year's symposium will explore the meaning of leadership in a global context. According to many practitioners and scholars global leadership is an emerging field that seeks to understand and explain the impact of globalization processes on leadership. Our scholar authors will provide theoretical frameworks and practical considerations for this exploration. They will also provide thoughtful discourse and perspectives on what it means to prepare students for a global society. Participants will engage in rich dialogue and examine the intentional development of programs that can support students' understanding of the emerging language, style and practice of leadership, which fully values and takes into account an international viewpoint. The concept of cultures interrelatedness and interdependence will be discussed as these connections relate to the establishment of global priorities and mobilization toward purposeful action.



Learning objectives of the 2009 Symposium include:

  • Understand the qualities and attribute of global leaders.
  • Identify key competencies and concrete experiences that influence global leadership development.
  • Acknowledge the distinct differences of Western Cultural approaches to leadership within the global context.
  • Consider the intersection of Western Culture and the global perspective.
  • Provide participants with a foundation to support students in making meaning of what leadership signifies in a global context.
  • Creation of a network of practitioners, educators and scholars that explores and informs a current understanding of leadership in a global context.



In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to have read the following articles and books:

  • Crosby, B. and Bryson, J. M. (2005). Leadership for the common good, 2nd ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Dorfman, P., Hanges, P. J., & Brodbeck, F. C. (2004). Leadership and cultural variation: The identification of culturally endorsed leadership profiles. In R. J. House, P. J. Hanges, M. Javidan, P. Dorfman & V. Gupta (Eds.), Leadership, culture, and organizations: The GLOBE study of 62 societies (pp. 667-718). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
  • Javidan, M., Dorfman, P. W., Sully de Luque, M., & House, R. J. (2006) In the eye of the beholder: Cross cultural lessons in leadership from Project GLOBE. Academy of Management Perspectives, 20(1), 67-90 .
  • Mendenhall , M ,Osland, J., Bird, A., Oddou, G. R. and Maznevski , M. (2008). Global leadership: Research, practice and development. Routledge Global Human Resource Management.


Scholars-in-Residence:

  • Dr. Barbara Crosby, Associate Professor, Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, MN
  • Dr. Peter Dorfman, Professor, College of Business, New Mexico State, NM
  • Dr. Joyce Osland, Professor of Global Leadership, College of Business, San Jose State University, CA


Program Chairs:

  • Karl Brooks, Doctoral Candidate, Dean of Student Success, Joliet Junior College, Joliet , IL
  • Dr. Lucy Croft, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL


Accommodations and Meals:
The Symposium participants will stay in the Lakeview Residence Hall. Each suite has two single-occupancy bedrooms and a shared bathroom. Efforts will be made to honor suite mate requests that are submitted on the Participant Information Form included in the registration confirmation packet. If you do not have a suite mate preference, a suite mate will be assigned to you. All meals will be provided through your registration. Please indicate any special dietary needs on the Participant Information Form.

Early Registration Fees and Deadlines:
TBA

Regular Registration Fees and Deadlines:
TBA

Workshop Registration Limit:
This workshop is limited to 50 participants and is open to NACA/NCLP members and non-members on a first-come, first-served basis.

Refund Policy:
Refunds for registration will be made only for requests received in writing at the NACA Office prior to the early registration deadline for the Symposium. No refunds will be given for Symposium registrations after the stated early registration deadline. However, participant substitutions may be allowed. A $100 administrative fee will be charged for each cancellation.

2008

2008 National Leadership Symposium

Authenticity as a Spiritual framework for educating a new generation of leaders

July 10 - 13, 2008
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA

NLS 2008 Proceedings

Now in its 18th year, the National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals and other education practitioners involved with promoting college student leadership education.

The National Leadership Symposium is a joint program coordinated by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP). Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium (included required reading prior to attending), it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 people.

This year's symposium will explore the connection of spirituality to leadership and paves the way for scholars and practitioners to revisit the foundation of leadership based on authenticity. Our scholar authors will provide a theoretical framework for defining authenticity and value-based leadership with an emphasis on spirituality. Participants will engage in critical discussion and consider the intentional development of programs that can support studentsÕ deeper meaning of leadership. As well, participants will consider the purposeful action colleges and universities can take to develop morally authentic habits in students, which can serve to influence communities and organizations toward a deeper commitment to social and civic responsibility.

Learning objectives of the 2008 Symposium include:

  • Understanding the intersections between spirituality and leadership
  • Explore values and character development and their effects on leadership
  • Revisit ones own leadership philosophy
  • Creation of a network of practitioners, educators and scholars that informs a more current undertanding of the collective work in spirituality and leadership

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to have read the following books:

  • Encouraging Authenticity & Spirituality in Higher Education by Arthur Chickering, Jon C. Dalton, and Liesa Stamm
  • Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith by Sharon Daloz Parks
  • Salsa, Soul, and Spirit: Leadership for a Multicultural Age by Juana Bordas

Scholars-in-Residence:

  • Dr. Jon C. Dalton; Associate Professor in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Dr. Sharon Daloz Parks; Associate Director and Faculty Whidbey Institute, Clinton, WA
  • Ms. Juana Bordas; President of Mestiza Leadership International, Denver, CO

Program Chairs:

  • Karl Brooks, Doctoral Candidate, Director of Leadership Institute , DePaul University, Chicago, IL
  • Dr. Lucy Croft, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL

Accommodations and Meals:
The Symposium participants will stay in university apartments. Each apartment has two single-occupancy bedrooms. Efforts will be made to honor apartment mate requests that are submitted on the Participant Information Form included in the registration confirmation packet. If you do not have an apartment mate preference, an apartment mate will be assigned to you. All meals will be provided through your registration. Please indicate any special dietary needs on the Participant Information Form.

Workshop Registration Limit:
This workshop is limited to 50 participants and is open to NACA/NCLP members and non-members on a first-come, first-served basis.

Refund Policy:
Refunds for registration will be made only for requests received in writing at the NACA Office prior to the early registration deadline for the Symposium. No refunds will be given for Symposium registrations after the stated early registration deadline. However, participant substitutions may be allowed. A $100 administrative fee will be charged for each cancellation.

2007

2007 National Leadership Symposium

Celebrating the Social Change Model: Insights and Applications for the Future

July 12 - 15, 2007
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA

NLS 2007 Proceedings

To register, please visit www.naca.org/NACA/Events/WorkshopsOtherEvents. You do not need to be an NACA member to register online.

Early Registration Fees and Deadlines: $495 until June 19, 2007
Regular Registration Fees and Deadlines: $525 after June 19, 2007



The 2007 National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals and other education practitioners involved with promoting college student leadership education.

The National Leadership Symposium is a joint program coordinated and sponsored by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP). Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium (including required reading prior to attending), it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 people.

In 1993, Helen and Alexander Astin of the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA created a Working Ensemble of colleagues from across the country to contemplate a model of leadership development for academia. The work of this Ensemble produced the Social Change Model. In honor of the 10th year of the Social Change Model, this year's Symposium will consider the leadership needs of our increasingly complex and diverse world. Our scholar authors will share stories of real social change agents who exemplify the values of the model and challenge participants to make meaning of those stories as well as the lessons imbedded in the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership. Individually and collectively, participants will consider the ways in which these stories and the study inform the work we, as leadership educators, do to educate our colleagues and students for change.



Symposium Outcomes

Learning objectives of the 2007 Symposium include:

  • Understanding the contemporary leadership needs of our complex and global world
  • Learning how data from the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership can inform our leadership programs and initiatives
  • Develop applications for our communities of practice; through the work we do with both our colleagues and students.
  • Creation of a network of practitioners, educators and scholars that informs a more current understanding of the collective work


National Leadership Symposium Scholars-in-Residence

  • Dr. Alexander Astin, Senior Scholar & Founding Director of the Higher Education Research Institute
  • Dr. Helen Astin, Professor Emeritus & Senior Scholar of the Higher Education Research Institute
  • Dr. Susan Komives, Associate Professor and Program Director of College Student Development graduate program at the University of Maryland
  • Liza Featherstone, New York Journalist and frequent contributor to The Nation and the Washington Post
  • Cheryl H. Keen, Vice President and Dean of Faculty, Antioch College
  • Jon Wilson, former Editor-in-Chief of Hope magazine


Required Reading

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of these assigned books and documents on leadership constructs prior to the program. The particular books that will be discussed are:

  • Common Fire: Lives of Commitment in a Complex World, by Laurent A. Parks Daloz, Cheryl H. Keen, James P. Keen, and Sharon Daloz Parks
  • Students Against Sweatshops, by Liza Featherstone
  • Signs of Hope, edited by Jon Wilson and Kimberly Ridley
  • A Social change Model of Leadership Development Guidebook, Higher Education Research Institute (purchased through the NCLP)

2006

2006 National Leadership Symposium

Educating Tomorrow's Leaders
through Contemporary Learning Organizations


July 20 -23, 2006
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA

To register, please print and fax/mail the registration form
available on the National Leadership Symposium brochure.



The 2006 National leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals, and other education practitioners involved with promoting college student leadership education. The National Leadership Symposium is a joint program coordinated and sponsored by the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) and the National Clearinghouse of Leadership Programs (NCLP). Given the intense learning environment of the Symposium ( including required reading in prior to attending), it is advised that participants have significant professional experience in leadership education. Registration is limited to 50 participants.

In his 1990 book The Fifth Discipline, Peter Senge acknowledged that organizations can learn. An interdisciplinary perspective forms the foundation of basic principles of how organizations can learn and why leaders and members of organizations should care about learning organizations. Starting with Senge's idea of the learning organization, but moving beyond it, the theme of the 2006 National Leadership Symposium is "Educating Tomorrow's Leaders through Contemporary Learning Organizations." What do today's learning organizations look like? How are they created? How does technology influence how and if organizations learn?

Symposium Outcomes

Learning objectives of the 2006 symposium include:

  • Understanding what contemporary learning organizations are.
  • Identifying barriers and avenues to creating learning organizations.
  • Being aware of the individual responsibilities in creating learning organizations: knowing the self, knowing members of the organization, engendering trust.
  • Differentiating groups, teams, and learning organizations.
  • Learning and practicing behaviors that encourage the creating of learning organizations.


National Leadership Symposium Scholars-in-Residence

  • Dr. Marie A. Cini
    Assistant Vice President for Academic Programs and Initiatives
    City University, Vancouver British Columbia
  • Nancy Margulies
    Mindscapes by Nancy
    Montara, CA
  • Dr. Carol Pearson
    Director, James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership
    University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland
  • Dr. George Roth
    Researcher, MIT Center for Organizational Learning and Co-founder Reflection Learning Associates. Inc
    Cambridge, Massachusetts


Required Reading

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of these assigned books and documents on leadership constructs prior to the program. The particular books that will be discussed are:

  • The Hero Within: Six Archetypes We Live By by Carol S. Pearson, PH.D.

A modern classic of Jungian psychology, The Hero Within has helped hundreds of thousands of people enrich their lives by revealing how to tap the power of the archetypes that exist within. Drawing from literature, anthropology, and psychology, author Carol S. Pearson clearly defines six heroic archetypes - the Innocent, the Orphan, the Wanderer, the Warrior, the Altruist, and the Magician - and shows how we can use these powerful guides to discover our own hidden gifts, solve difficult problems, and transform our lives with rich sources of inner strength.

This book will speak deeply to the evolving hero in all of us and reverberate through every part of our lives. With poignant wisdom and prolific examples, it gives us enduring tools to help us develop our own innate heroic gifts - the Orphan's resilience, the Wanderer's independence, the Warrior's courage, the Altruist's compassion, the Innocent's faith, and the Magician's abiding power.

  • The Dance of Change by Peter Senge

Since Peter Senge published his groundbreaking book The Fifth Discipline, he and his associates have frequently been asked by the business community: "How do we go beyond the first steps of corporate change? How do we sustain momentum?" They know that companies and organzations cannot thrive today without learning to adapt their attitudes and practices. But companies that establish change initiatives discover, after initial success, that even the most promising efforts to transform or revitalize organizations - despite interest, resources, and compelling business results - can fail to sustain themselves over time. That's because organizations have complex, well-developed immune systems, aimed at preserving the status quo. Now, drawing upon new theories about leadership and the long-term success of change initiatives, and based upon twenty-five years of experience building learning organizations, the authors of The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook show how to accelerate success and avoid the obstacles that can stall momentum. The Dance of Change, written for managers and executives at every level of an organization, reveals how business leaders can work together to anticipate the challenges that profound change will ultimately force the organization to face. Then, in a down-to-earth and compellingly clear format, readers will learn how to build the personal and organizational capabilities needed to meet those challenges. These challenges are not imposed from the outside; they are the product of assumptions and practices that people take for granted-an inherent, natural part of the processes of change. And they can stop innovation cold, unless managers at all levels learn to anticipate them and recognize the hidden rewards in each challenge, and the potential to spur further growth. Within the frequently encountered challenge of "Not Enough Time," for example-the lack of control over time available for innovation and learning initiatives-lies a valuable opportunity to reframe the way people organize their workplace. This book identifies universal challenges that organizations ultimately find themselves confronting, including the challenge of "Fear and Anxiety"; the need to diffuse learning across organizational boundaries; the ways in which assumptions built in to corporate measurement systems can handcuff learning initiatives; and the almost unavoidable misunderstandings between "true believers" and nonbelievers in a company. Filled with individual and team exercises, in-depth accounts of sustaining learning initiatives by managers and leaders in the field, and well-tested practical advice, The Dance of Change provides an insider's perspective on implementing learning and change initiatives at such corporations as British Petroleum, Chrysler, Dupont, Ford, General Electric, Harley-Davidson, Hewlett-Packard, Mitsubishi Electric, Royal Dutch/Shell, Shell Oil Company, Toyota, the United States Army, and Xerox. It offers crucial advice for line-level managers, executive leaders, internal networkers, educators, and others who are struggling to put change initiatives into practice.

  • The World Café by Juanita Brown and David Isaacs

The World Café is a flexible, easy-to-use process for fostering collaborative dialogue, sharing mutual knowledge, and discovering new opportunities for action. Based on living systems thinking, this innovative approach creates dynamic networks of conversation that can catalyze an organization's or community's own collective intelligence around its most important questions.
Filled with stories of actual Café dialogues in business, education, government, and community organizations across the globe, this uniquely crafted book demonstrates how the World Café can be adapted to any setting or culture. Examples from such varied organizations as Hewlett-Packard, American Society for Quality, the nation of Singapore, the University of Texas, and many others, demonstrate the process in action.
Along with is seven core design principles, The World Café offers practical tips for hosting "conversations that matter" in groups of any size-strengthening both personal relationships and people's capacity to shape the future together.

  • Visual Thinking; Tools for Mapping Your Ideas by Nancy Margulies and Christine Valenza

Free yourself from the limiting belief that you can't draw and move into the dynamic world of visible thinking for you and your students. The authors have compiled a symbolary of easy- to-draw iconographs that can be used to enrich communication, provoke deeper thought, and make the process of creating Mind Maps and Mindscapes for note taking and review in your classroom a breeze. Visual Thinking breaks down the process of drawing into small steps so that anyone who thinks they cannot draw will find that in fact, they can. Visible thinking templates help students work through challenging problem-solving activities. As their thinking processes are recorded, students become more thorough and skillful in reaching conclusions and making decisions.

2004

2004 National Leadership Symposium

Leadership in a Challenging World: A Call for Transformative Civic Engagement

July 15 - 18, 2004
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA


The 2004 National Leadership Symposium is a professional development experience designed for faculty, student affairs administrators, and staff practitioners involved with college student leadership development. Participants should have significant professional experience in leadership education.

College students, and young people in general, are looking for a world that embraces all living beings, not just those who are privileged enough to live in circumstances of affluence and power. We all seek leadership that both heals and transforms; l eadership that heals the wounds of a global society that is experiencing the deep and continuous pains of violence, medical epidemics, fractured social relationships, poverty and forced isolation. Leadership that transforms the very consciousness of people such that acceptance of old ways of acting out of fear and hatred are exceptions, not the rule. Behaving differently is significant, though not sufficient to build or sustain the kind of change that is needed in the world. A broader collective understanding of the dynamics of democratic engagement, power and social change is required to be effective in leadership roles in all institutions, by all people. People of all ages and in all life circumstances are not only ready to engage in this type of leadership, they are being called by historical conditions to do no less.


Symposium Outcomes

Leadership that creates pathways to social change, civic engagement and learning that makes a difference will be the focus of our work at the 2004 Leadership Symposium. Specifically, Symposium participants will:

  • Explore the application of three familiar leadership models (social change model, servant leadership and transformational leadership) within the framework of a call for transformative leadership.
  • Develop an understanding of the dynamics and influence of civic leadership in social change, civic engagement and learning.
  • Recognize that diverse frames of reference, backgrounds and experiences can influence both students' and professionals' understanding of the practice and ideals of democracy.
  • Create a personal plan for modeling effective civic engagement, civic leadership and democratic practice.
  • Design a civic leadership experience for students consistent with the context of their campus and community while, at the same time, expanding the frontiers of understanding about broader dynamics that can enhance or impede the kind of social change that is needed.
  • Create a network of practitioners, educators and scholars that is developed through book reviews, skill sessions and small group work.



Scholars-in-Residence

  • Ms. Juana Bordas
    President, Mestiza Leadership International
  • Dr. Tony Chambers
    Associate Professor, School of Education, University of Michigan
  • Dr. Edmund O'Sullivan
    Director of the Transformative Learning Centre, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, at the University of Toronto
  • Dr. Suzanne Morse
    Executive Director of the Pew Partnership


Required Reading

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of these assigned books and documents on leadership constructs prior to the program. The particular books that will be discussed are:

  • Expanding the Boundaries of Transformative Learning: Essays on Theory and Praxis by Edmund O'Sullivan, Amish Morrell and Mary Ann O'Connor
  • The Tribe of Many Colors: Leadership for an American Democracy by Juana Bordas
  • Smart Communities: How Citizens and Local Leaders Can Use Strategic Thinking to Build a Brighter Future by Suzanne Morse

SYMPOSIUM DETAILS

REGISTRATION FORM

2003

2003 National Leadership Symposium

Making the Case for Leadership Education: Leadership Lessons Learned

July 17-20, 2003
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA


Perhaps the highest hope we have for students as they graduate from college is that they will become responsible, informed citizens contributing where they live and work. James MacGregor Burns concluded, "Leadership is one of the most observed and least understood phenomena on earth." How can we help to prepare students to assume roles of leadership without clear understanding and observable evidence that our programs contribute to the educational missions of our institutions. So begs the question and forms the foundation for this year's National Leadership Symposium, "How can we make the case for leadership education on our campuses?" The National Leadership Symposium will focus on an examination of the impact of leadership programs and courses in higher education. What do our students learn and how do they demonstrate that learning? How do we effectively tell the story of leadership education outcomes?


Symposium Outcomes

  • Affirmation of the role of higher education in preparing students to be leaders where they will live and work.
  • Identification of leadership lessons learned through gender roles and organizational involvement.
  • Exploration of the theory and application of leadership with implications for outcomes assessment.
  • Development of strategies for advancing leadership education.
  • Creation of a network of practitioners, educators and scholars developed through book reviews, skill sessions, and small group work.


Scholars-in-Residence

  • Dr. Jan L. Arminio
    Assistant Professor, Shippensburg University
  • Wilfred Drath
    Senior Fellow, Center for Creative Leadership
  • Dr. Susan R. Komives
    Associate Professor, University of Maryland
  • Dr. Kathleen Zimmerman-Oster
    Associate Professor, University of Detroit Mercy
    President and Director of Evaluation Services, TEST, Inc.


Required Reading

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of three assigned books on leadership constructs prior to the program. The particular books that will be discussed are:

  • The Deep Blue Sea: Rethinking the Source of Leadership by Wilfred Drath
  • Exploring Leadership by Susan Komives
  • Leadership in the Making by Kathleen Zimmerman-Oster

2002

2002 National Leadership Symposium

Defining Moments: Teaching Leadership to the Millennial Generation

July 18-21, 2002
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA


"The kids who grew up with peace and prosperity are facing their defining moment," declared Newsweek magazine on November 12, 2001. The millennial generation is coming to campus and beginning to assert their ideas about the nation and the world. More than any recent generation, they are focused on their communities and have the capacity to make a difference. How are we to respond as leadership educators? The National Leadership Symposium for summer 2002 has been designed to look at defining moments for the millennial generation as they intersect with emerging theories of leadership and ideas about the teaching/learning process. We will explore together the work that we must do to prepare ourselves to become more effective leadership educators in a world in which the very nature of leadership is changing.

Symposium Outcomes

Specific outcomes of the Symposium will include:

  • An understanding of the millennial generation, their defining moments, and how they respond to change in a post-September 11 world.
  • Explorations of emerging trends of the millennial generation, how they view leadership, and implications for teaching and learning.
  • Applications of active learning pedagogy in leadership education.
  • Development of strategies for teaching leadership as a process for creating and negotiating change and managing crises.
  • Network of practitioners and scholars developed through book reviews, skill sessions and small group work.



Scholars-in-Residence

  • Paul Arnston
    Professor, Northwestern University
  • Jim Cain
    Executive Director, Association for Challenge Course Technology (ASST)
    Manager, Cornell University Corporate Teambuilding Program
  • Nancy Huber
    Associate Professor, University of Arizona
  • Peter Northouse
    Professor, Western Michigan University



Required Readingse

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of three assigned books on leadership constructs prior to the program. The particular books that will be discusses are:

  • Teamwork & Teamplay by Cain and Jolliff
  • Leadership: Theory and Practice by Northouse
  • Leading from Within: Developing Personal Direction by Huber

2001

2001 National Leadership Symposium

Pluralistic Leadership: Intersecting Tensions and Connections

July 19-22, 2001
Marquette University
Milwaukee, WI


According to Cox as stated in Kezar (2000)*, pluralistic leaders produce a climate that values diversity, draws on aggregate voices and resources of the campus, fully integrates all cultures into the organizational system, minimizes institutional cultural disposition and reduces intergroup conflict. The overall goal of the 11th annual National Leadership Symposium is to address how collaborative forms of leadership have the capacity to cultivate an inclusive environment. The program will focus on the utilization of case studies as a device for enhancing collaborative leadership within a pluralistic society.


Symposium Outcomes

The Symposium, through its unique Scholars-in-Residence format, will provide delegates the opportunity for intellectual exchange with educators in the field. Intended outcomes of the three-day Symposium are:

  • An awareness of how one's identity, positionality and power conditions impact one's leadership beliefs and actions.
  • A specific exploration of leadership from gender and racial perspectives.
  • The ability to interpret leadership behaviors from a variety of standpoints, as well as the ability to cultivate a variety of voices and leadership styles.
  • An exploration of ways to negotiate multiple interpretations of leadership.
  • Illumination of commonalties between scholars, theorists and practitioners as a way of thinking about our role as educators.
  • Applications from pluralistic perspectives as a guide to the creation of leadership instructional tools for both the academic and co-curricular setting utilizing the case study method.
  • Creation of networks developed through book reviews, skill sessions and small group work.



Scholars-in-Residence

  • Dr. Barbara Crosby
    Author of Leadership for Global Citizenship: Building Transnational Community
  • Dr. Adrianna Kezar
    Assistant Professor, George Washington University
    Director, ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education
  • Dr. Lea Williams
    Author of Servants of the People: The 1960's Legacy of African American Leadership



Required Readings

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of the assigned books on leadership constructs prior to the program. Discount ordering information will be included in the delegate registration packet. The books that will be utilized as a foundation this year are:

  • Leadership for Global Citizenship: Building Transnational Community by Barbara Crosby
  • Servants of the People: The 1960's Legacy of African American Leadership by Lea Williams and
  • Women of Influence, Women of Vision: A Cross-Generational Study of Leaders and Social Change by Helen Astin and Carole Leland

2000

2000 National Leadership Symposium

A New Millennium for Theory and Practice:
Civic Leadership, Servant Leadership, and Character Leadership


July 20-23, 2000
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA


At the dawn of the new millennium, we are confronted with unique phenomena, vague predictions and uncertain outcomes within the evolvoing discipline of leadership studies. The overall goal of the 10th annual National Leadership Symposium is to address the theoretical ground upon which the study and practice of undergraduate leadership education stands. An objective is to clarify and shape the conceptual diversity that tends to cloud our understanding of the complex relationship between leadership theory and practice. The program will center on conversations and applications of civic, servant, and character leadership development.


Symposium Outcomes

The symposium, through its unique Scholars-in-Residence format, will provide delegates the opportunity for intellectual exchange with educators in the field. Intended outcomes of the three-day Symposium are:

  • Illumination of commonalities between scholars, theorists and practitioners as a way of thinking about our role as educators.
  • Application of leadership theory and practice as a guide to the creation of leadership instructional tools for both the academic and co-curricular setting.
  • Exploration of ways to integrate leadership theories and practices.
  • Discussion of the complex nature of leadership from diverse perspectives.
  • Creation of networks developed through book review, skill sessions and small group work.
  • Investigation into new research, evaluation and assessment methods that may help us shape leadership education in the future.



Scholars-in-Residence

  • Dr. Richard A. Couto
    Professor and George Matthews and Virginia Brinkley Modlin Chair in Leadership Studies, Jepson School of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond
  • David D. Chrislip
    Principal, Skillful Means
  • Dr. Linda Klebe Trevino
    Chair, Management and Organizational Behavior, Smeal College of Business Administration, Pennsylvania State University
  • Dr. Dennis Roberts
    Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, Miami University-Ohio



Required Reading

In order to fully participate in the Symposium experience, delegates are expected to read and generate a working knowledge of three assigned books on leadership constructs prior to the program. The particular books that will be discusses are:

  • Teaching Democracy by Being Democratic by Becker and Couto (Eds.)
  • Collaborative Leadership: How Citizens and Civic Leaders Can Make a Difference by Chrislip and Larson
  • Managing Business Ethics by Trevino, Nelson and Nelson